International Relations between North and South Korea


The Korean peninsula is one of the most volatile regions in the world. It comprises of north and South Korea. Initially it was a joint block that was divided over time. Korea attained its independence in 1945 from the Soviet Union. The two sides began their differences from a political background. The Soviet Union and china instigated communism ideals to the north while the South adopted a capitalistic approach. It received backing from the US. In 1950 the north attacked the weak south after the US troops pulled out. The war ended in 1953 after the UN saw an armistice agreement signed by the two sides. The north has little interaction to the international community compared to the south.

North Korea has embarked on strengthening its military force. It has more than 120, 000 troops on duty with a population of 30 million. The country is lead by a “monarchy”. Kim Il Sung family line has ruled for over 60 years that they have been independent. The communism in the north states that all the production lines are owned by the government. This has made the country home to the forth mightiest army in the world but a poor civilian population. China is the only international country linked to the north. South Korea on the other hand has experienced a flourishing economy and good relationship with the outside world, the European Union to be specific.

The military options adopted by the two countries have left the world in a panic mode. North Korea has embarked on nuclear upgrades. In 2006 and 2010 they detonated test nuclear bombs. The move attracted the international world, mainly the US. There has been minimum effect to know how deep the nuclear program goes, resulting from the secretive nature of North Korea’s governance. However, South Korea has held an open economy. In 2010 it hosted the annual G20 summit. The UN later posted it as the thirteenth strongest economies in the world. It is the second largest exporter to Europe.

South Korea has managed to move from the war of 1953 and has emerged as a powerful economy. North Korea on the other hand still has issues with the armistice signed to end that war. It has honored the land boundaries set by the UN. However it has problems with the maritime boundary, which is not clearly defined in the armistice. It is known as the Northern Limit Line. The future relations can be better addressed if the line can be further defined.