Expert suggestions on choosing strong argument research essay topics


Argumentative research papers can be enjoyable to write, especially if you have a topic that has been suggested by an expert in the field. Instructors will decades of experience know how to help students decide on strong topics that offer several arguments that students can focus on writing. Sadly, many students ignore the suggestions from the expert in the classroom and they tend to pick topics that are overused and have very little argument left in them.

When it comes time to choose a strong argumentative research paper topic, the experts make a few general suggestions. Here they are:

  1. Avoid the cliche topics. Too many students will pick the old stand-bys. These are the topics that have been argued for years, like abortion, assisted suicide, and drug legalization. While students think that these topics are strong and worth arguing, teachers are tired of reading them. These topics only have two sides, either pro or con, and neither side has had anything new to offer in many years. One way to quickly tell if topic has been over-argued is to look at the dates of the source material. If everything is over five years old, then it is time to pick something newer and more relevant.

  2. Go local. Students often neglect the local angle of any topic, because the national or international angle tends to be more exciting in the students’ eyes. However, once they realize that a large topic does affect them where they live, students are then able to develop an argument that is meaningful to them. This is when topics get interesting and argumentative research paper become strong. Students are often able to access primary source material instead of material from second- or third-hand voices. When students can write about something that affects them personally, they have an easier time including their own vivid voices.

  3. Look around before committing. Today’s Internet-dominated world makes it much easier than previous years to find inspiration for research papers. Before the Internet, students had to create their topics from scratch. Now, the Internet is full of millions of pages with suggestions. It is worth it for students to look around and see what other people have argued before they commit to a topic. Looking around can become overwhelming, so be sure to limit your looking. When you find three to five possible topics, you should stop looking and make up your mind.